EQUUS: Hands On Pop Quiz Final Exam Part 3

Test your equine knowledge with Part 3 of the EQUUS: Hands On Pop Quiz Final Exam--a 10-question Pop Quiz from the editors of EQUUS magazine, covering topics ranging from equine anatomy to horse health and feeding.
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As you work your way through this Pop Quiz, you'll find that each question is on its own page. The question is repeated with the corresponding answer on the following page.

Question 1

Your horse is standing with one leg held awkwardly off the ground. He is agitated and in obvious pain. You fear that he has fractured a bone and you don't want to further compromise his condition. Which option from the list that follows could cause the most harm as an initial reaction?

a.Making him walk

b.Sedating him

c.Allowing him to drink

d.Moving the injured limb

Answer on next page >



Question 1
Your horse is standing with one leg held awkwardly off the ground. He is agitated and in obvious pain. You fear that he has fractured a bone and you don't want to further compromise his condition. Which option from the list that follows could cause the most harm as an initial reaction?

a.Making him walk

b.Sedating him

c.Allowing him to drink

d.Moving the injured limb

Answer 1

B. Even if a horse with a serious leg injury is panicking, sedation can further compromise his balance and cause a dangerous drop in blood pressure, particularly if he's already experiencing shock. Do not administer medication of any sort unless directed by a veterinarian.

To protect himself, the horse isn't likely to allow you to move his injured limb or walk him. He may, however, want to take a drink of water as you wait for your veterinarian to arrive, and it is safe to allow it.

Question 2 >



Question 2

It's already dark when you lead your horse from his field into the brightly lit barn. He enters hesitantly, staggers into a large tack trunk, then scrambles backward and bumps into a wall. After nearly a minute of confusion and mild panic, he settles down and seems fine. What's the reason for his odd behavior?

Answer on next page >



Question 2

It's already dark when you lead your horse from his field into the brightly lit barn. He enters hesitantly, staggers into a large tack trunk, then scrambles backward and bumps into a wall. After nearly a minute of confusion and mild panic, he settles down and seems fine. What's the reason for his odd behavior?

Answer 2

For a brief time he couldn't see. Horse's eyes take much longer to adjust to changes in lighting than ours do, particularly when going from dark to bright conditions. So that your horse doesn't experience temporary blindness, allow him to stand at the barn door for a minute when walking him from darkness into bright light. Watch him closely and proceed only when he seems comfortable and fully aware of his surroundings.

Question 3 >



Question 3

Appaloosas aren't the only horses with distinctive markings. Match the names below with the appropriate descriptions of a trio of spots that can adorn a wide range of breeds.

1.Birdcatcher spots

2.Blood marks

3.Bend Or spots

a.Seen primarily on chestnuts and palominos, these dark marks appear in a variety of sizes and at any time during a horse's life. They are named for a 19th century Thoroughbred racehorse who had them.

b.Usually found on the shoulder, these rust-red splotches appear only on gray horses and they grow larger with age.

c.Small, white dots that spontaneously and randomly appear on the body and/or neck or horses of any color, these markings may disappear with time. They, too, are named for a Thoroughbred.

Answer on next page >



Question 3

Appaloosas aren't the only horses with distinctive markings. Match the names below with the appropriate descriptions of a trio of spots that can adorn a wide range of breeds.

1.Birdcatcher spots

2.Blood marks

3.Bend Or spots

a.Seen primarily on chestnuts and palominos, these dark marks appear in a variety of sizes and at any time during a horse's life. They are named for a 19th century Thoroughbred racehorse who had them.

b.Usually found on the shoulder, these rust-red splotches appear only on gray horses and they grow larger with age.

c.Small, white dots that spontaneously and randomly appear on the body and/or neck or horses of any color, these markings may disappear with time. They, too, are named for a Thoroughbred.

Answer 3

1.C

2.B

3.A

Question 4 >



Question 4

Most riders and many of their horses understand what the word whoa means. But some other verbal commands--particularly those used during the days when horses commonly were driven--have fallen out of use over time. For instance, what are the meanings of gee and haw?

Answer on next page >



Question 4

Most riders and many of their horses understand what the word whoa means. But some other verbal commands--particularly those used during the days when horses commonly were driven--have fallen out of use over time. For instance, what are the meanings of gee and haw?

Answer 4

Gee means "go right" and haw means '"go left." These commands are still used by some drivers today.

Question 5 >



Question 5

Can you identify all of these horse-related terms that begin with the letter P?

1.An autoimmune disease characterized by the formation of pustules in the superficial layers of the skin

2.A horse with large black and white patches on his coat

3.A dental malformation in which the lower jaw is abnormally short

4.A soft medicated substance, typically a paste, that is spread over minor swelling

Answer on next page >



Question 5

Can you identify all of these horse-related terms that begin with the letter P?

1.An autoimmune disease characterized by the formation of pustules in the superficial layers of the skin

2.A horse with large black and white patches on his coat

3.A dental malformation in which the lower jaw is abnormally short

4.A soft medicated substance, typically a paste, that is spread over minor swelling

Answer 5

1.Pemphigus foliaceous

2.Piebald

3.Parrot mouth

4.Poultice

Question 6 >



Question 6

Which holds more: your horse's stomach or his water bucket?

Answer on next page >



Question 6

Which holds more: your horse's stomach or his water bucket?

Answer 6

Your horse's water bucket, which holds about 20 quarts, has nearly twice the capacity of his stomach. Able to hold an average of eight to 12 quarts, the stomach is one of the smallest organs of the equine digestive tract, accounting for only 8 percent of the total gastrointestinal volume. In fact, little actual digestion occurs in the stomach. It serves mainly as a small collection and holding tank, metering out material to the small intestine.

Question 7 >



Question 7

True or false: All Arabians have one less vertebra than horses of other breeds.

Answer on next page >



Question 7

True or false: All Arabians have one less vertebra than horses of other breeds.

Answer 7

False. Although it is true that many Arabians have one less lumbar vertebra than most horses--five instead of the usual six--there are many purebred Arabians that have the full allotment. Furthermore, horses of other breeds may have only five. Those with Arabian influence, such as Thoroughbreds, are more likely to be missing a lumbar vertebra.

Question 8 >



Question 8

Can you identify the terms that are the names of foods and have a place in the equine lexicon as well?

1.A nut that is popular roasted; also the froglike remnant of the prehistoric horse's first phalanx

2.An ingredient in succotash; also a bruise in the angle of the sole

3.A vine-hanging fruit; also the lumpy advancement of pastern dermatitis

4.Fruit of the hawthorn shrub; also the horse's nictitating membrane

Answer on next page >



Question 8

Can you identify the terms that are the names of foods and have a place in the equine lexicon as well?

1.A nut that is popular roasted; also the froglike remnant of the prehistoric horse's first phalanx

2.An ingredient in succotash; also a bruise in the angle of the sole

3.A vine-hanging fruit; also the lumpy advancement of pastern dermatitis

4.Fruit of the hawthorn shrub; also the horse's nictitating membrane

Answer 8

1.Chestnut

2.Corn

3.Grapes

4.Haw

Question 9 >



Question 9

Can you solve this math problem based on what you know about your horse's anatomy?

Subtract the number of chambers in a horse's heart from his number of ribs. Divide the result by the number of gallons his stomach can hold, then add the number of lobes of his thyroid gland.

Answer on next page >



Question 9

Can you solve this math problem based on what you know about your horse's anatomy?

Subtract the number of chambers in a horse's heart from his number of ribs. Divide the result by the number of gallons his stomach can hold, then add the number of lobes of his thyroid gland.

Answer 9



36 (ribs) - 4 (chambers) + 2 (lobes) = 18

2 (gallons)

Question 10 >



Question 10

A local horsewoman with an exceptional vocabulary mentions that your horse's vibrissae are particularly long. What is she talking about?

Answer on next page >



Question 10

A local horsewoman with an exceptional vocabulary mentions that your horse's vibrissae are particularly long. What is she talking about?

Answer 10

The vibrissae are the long, stiff whiskers around a horse's muzzle and below his eyes. They are very sensitive to touch and help him determine the location of objects he may not see, such as food directly below his muzzle. Traditionally, the vibrissae are clipped to neaten the appearance of many types of show horses. But because of their important sensory function, it's best for them to remain untouched.

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