Oregon horse with strangles may have exposed others - The Horse Owner's Resource

Oregon horse with strangles may have exposed others

Forty potentially infected horses may have moved back to other parts of Multnomah or Clackamas county.
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A recently reported case of strangles in Oregon may have wider reaching implications as potentially exposed horses disperse across two counties.

The infected horse, an 18-year-old Quarter Horse gelding, began showing signs of the bacterial disease, including fever, nasal discharge, swelling under the jaw and draining abscesses under the jaw, on October 3, according to information supplied to the Equine Disease Communication Center (EDCC) The diagnosis was confirmed on October 7. The horse had been vaccinated.

Strangles can be passed from horse to horse by direct contact.

Strangles can be passed from horse to horse by direct contact. 

Along with several other horses, the infected horse had been living in temporary housing after being evacuated because of a barn fire. The EDCC warns that nearly 40 horses that have been moved back to other parts of Multnomah County or Clackamas County may have been exposed before the strangles case was confirmed.

Click here to read an in-depth article on the many myths about strangles. 

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