Seminar to explore horse care and training in medieval Europe

Horses were essential to everyday life in medieval Europe, but what do we know about how they were cared for and trained? A seminar on November 24 will explore that very topic.

A medieval tapestry featuring a horse being fed.
The seminar “Horse care and training in medieval Europe,” will explore the “what” and “how” of medieval equine husbandry practices.

During this seminar, the speakers will explain the “what” and “how” of horse care and training in medieval Europe based on contemporary hippiatric texts, administrative documents and practical experiments. At the seminar, two speakers will provide their exclusive insights into those vital topics, followed by general discussion

Emma Herbert-Davies is PhD candidate at the Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds. She will present a paper entitled “Medieval horse care: stable management and veterinary treatment in the 13th & 14th centuries”. In this, she will be drawing from a range of hippiatric texts and royal stable accounts to explore how horses were looked after. Topics including feeding, shoeing and the treatment of common injuries will be discussed to help shed light on the lived experiences of horses in the Middle Ages.

Camille Mai Lan Vo Van Qui is PhD candidate working as part of the Exeter Warhorse project. Her paper will analyze the horse-training advice found in the second chapter of different French translations of Jordanus Rufus’s “De medicina equorum,” exploring the reasons behind their use and their potential effects on real horses, complementing the information found in the text by experimentations on real horses.

The event will take place on either Zoom or Teams, and the link will be announced prior to the event in the event description. To indicate your interest in participating, click here.

The virtual seminars are sponsored by Cheiron : The International Journal of Equine and Equestrian History and by the Latvian Academy of Sport Education.

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