SINGLE BRITISH HORSE CHARITY PUMPS ?1 MILLION (approx. US$2 million) INTO EQUINE RESEARCH - The Horse Owner's Resource

SINGLE BRITISH HORSE CHARITY PUMPS ?1 MILLION (approx. US$2 million) INTO EQUINE RESEARCH

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Via press release and history files on hand
(FRIDAY JANUARY 19) The Horse Trust, based in Great Britain, has committed a further ?1 million (approximately $2 million in USD) to equine research and clinical scholarships. The Trust, formerly known as the Home of Rest for Horses, created five clinical scholarships and five scientific research grants following the recent meeting of its Scientific Committee.

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Paul Jepson, Chief Executive and Veterinary Director of the Trust said, "The Horse Trust's investment in equine research illustrates the charity's commitment to the health and welfare of all horses, to reduce pain and suffering and find cures and treatments to a variety of diseases."

THE HORSE TRUST'S 2007 GRANTS:

University of Bristol: Veterinary School Clinical Scholarship in Equine Studies
(Dentistry) ? 80,000
University of Edinburgh: Clinical Scholarship in Equine Studies ? 80,000
University of Glasgow: Veterinary Clinical Scholarship in Equine Clinical
Studies ? 80,000
University of Liverpool: Mucin gene expression in the equine respiratory tract
in response to disease relevant mediators ? 136,285
Animal Health Trust: A nationwide system for surveillance of equine grass
sickness - Phase 1: Development and implementation ? 89,873
Royal Veterinary College: Clinical Scholarship in Equine Clinical Epidemiology ? 80,000 Royal Veterinary College: Down-regulation of neutrophil accumulation in equine
inflammatory disease ? 182,056
UCL Institute of Orthopaedics: Age related changes to matrix turnover in functionally distinct equine tendons - an important determinant of susceptibility to tendonitis in horses ? 145,422
University of Liverpool : Equine geriatric health and welfare in the UK ?131,560
University of Liverpool: Clinical Scholarship in Equine Gastroenterology ?80,000
TOTAL ?1,085,196

The Horse Trust is the largest provider of funds for equine welfare in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1886, it is the oldest horse charity in the UK. Miss Ann Lindo, inspired by the book 'Black Beauty' and determined to do something about the plight of working horses, set up a home of rest for horses, mules and donkeys at a farm near London. Fittingly its first resident was an overworked London cab horse.

During the First World War, "The Home" provided the prototype of an early motorised horse ambulance to help the evacuation of wounded horses from the front lines in France.

When the number of working horses depending on a recovery farm declined in the mid-20th century, the group formed a foundation with the purpose of giving grants to aid the welfare of horses.

The Horse Trust is committed to a program of welfare, science and education: it funds research into equine diseases; gives grants to help build and equip equine hospitals throughout the country and works to raise awareness of the importance of cost, care and commitment to responsible horse ownership. The Horse Trust also manages The Home of Rest for Horses which, funded solely by donations and legacies, provides lifetime sanctuary for more than 100 retired working horses, ponies and donkeys.

Editor's note: Great Britain is home to 1.35 million horses, according to the British Equestrian Trade Association (BETA); The Horse Trust is one of many funding sources there, although it is the largest. By way of comparison in the USA, which is home to between 6 and 10 million horses (depending on whose figures you accept), the largest funding charity is the Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation, which allocated $957,260 to research projects in 2006. According to the watchdog web site charitynavigator.org, that foundation allocates approximately $750,000 per year to research. The American Quarter Horse Foundation allocated approximately $500,000 for research support this year. No doubt the contributions of The Horse Trust are resulting in new medical and welfare benefits to horses all over the world.

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