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When I first started working at EQUUS, one of the “easiest” assignments was reviewing manuscripts submitted for our True Tales section.

If you are familiar with True Tales you know that they are stories written by real people about their horses. In inviting submissions, the magazine calls for people to share stories about “episodes that typify the special relationship we have with our horses.” Over the years, we’ve featured firsthand accounts of horses who were lost or found, those who’ve survived calamity and others who’ve saved lives. Some are tales of adventure, others simply reflect on a particular equine life well-lived. A few will make you laugh or make you cry.

Although I always enjoyed reading and editing these real-life accounts, I tended to think of True Tales as something to work on “in between” the more important articles I was preparing for publication in each issue—reports about veterinary research, equine physiology, horsekeeping innovations, training techniques and the like.

Not long ago, however, I came to a realization. I was wrong about True Tales—they are, in fact, a very important part of EQUUS. Though you may not find them in record books or halls of fame, the horses featured in this section of the magazine are the very foundation of the horse industry. They are central to their owners’ lives, and they serve as the focal point for equestrian ambitions and as inspiration for countless dreams. In short, True Tales illustrate one of the key concepts upon which EQUUS is based: That horses are wonderful creatures who enrich our lives.

So, when your next issue of EQUUS arrives in your mailbox, go ahead and read our articles about veterinary research, horsekeeping techniques and physiology. But don’t forget to read the True Tale. I promise that it will be worth your time.

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